A quiet weekend, but more snow chances may right around the corner

November 27, 2015 0 Comments

Thankfully, our lone “rough” weather day in this holiday weekend is behind us and now we can focus on Christmas shopping or preparing for winter. In the wake of the rain, sleet, and snow event Thursday,¬†drier and colder¬†air has poured in from the Plains making thins blissfully tranquil, but a bit raw. Surface high pressure will eventually work to scour out some of our clouds and bring us some sunshine as soon as Saturday and that should at least allow temperatures reach seasonable levels. Our readings have been so mild over the past several weeks, when we actually get seasonable or typical late fall weather, it feels cold and brutal, but in reality this is much closer to the climate average in our region.

The upper level air pattern is keeping the really cold air up in Canada. A cut-off low in the Rocky Mountains is poised to slowly wobble in our direction from the west. This system will bring a chance of snow to the Midwest.

The upper level air pattern is keeping the really cold air up in Canada. A cut-off low in the Rocky Mountains is poised to slowly wobble in our direction from the west. This system will bring a chance of snow to the Midwest.

As the upcoming system makes its way into the Upper Mississippi Valley, we’ll have a chance to end November on a wintry note as a mixture of precipitation types is expected Monday, likely changing to mostly snow by Monday night. We may then be entering meteorological winter on a snowy note as a few inches of accumulation is expected Tuesday.

The main north branch of the jet stream will begin to push the system through our region on Monday and Tuesday as colder air settles in on the backside, bringing the possibility of accumulating snow for Tuesday.

The main north branch of the jet stream will begin to push the system through our region on Monday and Tuesday as colder air settles in on the backside, bringing the possibility of accumulating snow for Tuesday.

The main system moves away to the east in the middle of the week and our upper level pattern again shows signs of becoming a ridge in the Upper Midwest meaning mild, dry weather for the latter part of the first week of December.

A ridge aloft begins to shift eastward from the Rocky Mountains later next week, meaning mild weather may stick around for much of December.

A ridge aloft begins to shift eastward from the Rocky Mountains later next week, meaning mild weather may stick around for much of December.

The Climate Prediction Center’s latest 6 to 10 day outlook that looks ahead at the first couple of weeks of December suggests we may be warmer than normal and drier than normal for the first half of December.

 

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