A Break From Heavy Humidity

July 10, 2013 0 Comments

One of the great things about living in our region is the variety of weather we get throughout the year, especially in the summer.  Not everybody in the United States is lucky enough to get occasional cool spells in the summer or at least a respite from scorching heat and heavy humidity.  Our current dose of dry air comes in the wake of a cold front that swept through the Upper Mississippi Valley on Tuesday.  High pressure from western Canada is pouring some comfortably dry air into our area, something we can typically recognize on the weather map by looking at the dew point temperature.  That’s one way of seeing just how humid the air is.  In recent days, the dew point temperatures in our area had climbed from the 60s into the 70s meaning the atmosphere was rich with water vapor and humidity and things were feeling rather uncomfortable.  Below is a chart showing a rough “misery index” of humidity content in the air.  Our dew point temperatures have fallen into the 50s, which by seasonal standards is dry and comfortable.  We’ll enjoy this pleasant weather for about two days before more changes come our weather and we encounter more variety in our weather, something this region is know for year round.  Things are expected to become more humid by the weekend and that extra moisture is expected to again fuel some more rain chances in the area.

One way of measuring the moisture content of the atmosphere is through the dew point temperature. It's the temperature reading at which the air would become saturated if the air temperature would be cooled. A higher dew point temperature means there is more water vapor at the surface and thus the air would be saturated and likely heavier feeling in a warmer surface environment. Relative humidity percentages can be derived from these temperatures.

One way of measuring the moisture content of the atmosphere is through the dew point temperature. It’s the temperature reading at which the air would become saturated if the air temperature would be cooled. A higher dew point temperature means there is more water vapor at the surface and thus the air would be saturated and likely heavier feeling in a warmer surface environment. Relative humidity percentages can be derived from these temperatures.

Surface dew point temperatures have fallen into the 50s across most of the region meaning drier air is invading from Canada. The air ahead of the cold front to our south and east remains fairly humid today, but will dry out later as dry air sinks southward under this area of Canadian high pressure.

Surface dew point temperatures have fallen into the 50s across most of the region meaning drier air is invading from Canada. The air ahead of the cold front to our south and east remains fairly humid today, but will dry out later as dry air sinks southward under this area of Canadian high pressure.

Share

About the Author:

Leave a Reply